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Richard D. Brown, founding Director of the Humanities Institute, New Book “Self-Evident Truths: Contesting Equal Rights from the Revolution to the Civil War”

Richard Brown, distinguished professor emeritus of history, on Jan. 16, 2014. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)
Richard Brown, distinguished professor emeritus of history, on Jan. 16, 2014. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

- America’s Ongoing Struggle for Equal Rights -

- Kenneth Best - UConn Communications

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 Brown_newbookBook Information

Self-Evident Truths: Contesting Equal Rights from the Revolution to the Civil War

 A detailed and compelling examination of how the early Republic struggled with the idea that “all men are created equal”.
How did Americans in the generations following the Declaration of Independence translate its lofty ideals into practice? In this broadly synthetic work, distinguished historian Richard Brown shows that despite its founding statement that “all men are created equal,” the early Republic struggled with every form of social inequality. While people paid homage to the ideal of equal rights, this ideal came up against entrenched social and political practices and beliefs.Brown illustrates how the ideal was tested in struggles over race and ethnicity, religious freedom, gender and social class, voting rights and citizenship. He shows how high principles fared in criminal trials and divorce cases when minorities, women, and people from different social classes faced judgment. This book offers a much-needed exploration of the ways revolutionary political ideas penetrated popular thinking and everyday practice.
 

Richard D. Brown is Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of History, Emeritus, and the Founding Director of the Humanities Institute at the University of Connecticut. His previous books include Knowledge Is Power: The Diffusion of Information in Early America, 1700–1865;The Strength of a People: The Idea of an Informed Citizenry in Early America, 1650-1870; and the coauthored microhistory The Hanging of Ephraim Wheeler: A Story of Rape, Incest, and Justice in Early America.

TED2017: How to see past your own perspective and find truth.

Michael Lynch Director of the Humanities Institute.

Humility means seeing your worldview as open to improvement by the evidence & experience of others.

The more we read and watch online, the harder it becomes to tell the difference between what’s real and what’s fake. It’s as if we know more but understand less, says philosopher Michael Patrick Lynch. In this talk, he dares us to take active steps to burst our filter bubbles and participate in the common reality that actually underpins everything.

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Final event in an active year for The University of Connecticut Collaborative to Advance Equity Through Research on Women and Girls of Color

Dr. Dorothy RobertsA lecture given by Professor Dorothy Roberts on Wednesday April 26, 2017 at the Student Union Theater that had over 100 people in attendance. It was the final event in an active year for The University of Connecticut Collaborative to Advance Equity Through Research on Women and Girls of Color. Photos are from the lecture at the Student Union and UCHI was proud to lend support for the research, outreach, and activism from the Women and Girls of Color program.

 
Professor Roberts lectured on the evening of April 26th at UConn’s Law School in Hartford. For more on that event see: https://www.law.uconn.edu/calendar/event/2017/04/26/dr-dorothy-roberts-prisons-foster-care-and-systematic-punishment-black

 

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“Human and Nonhuman Animals: Minds and Morals” May 11-13, 2017 University of Connecticut, Storrs

The Expression, Communication, and Origins of Meaning (ECOM) Research Group is pleased to announce that it will be hosting a conference on:
 
May 11-13, 2017 
University of Connecticut, Storrs
 
The conference will bring together researchers from a number of disciplines working on continuities and discontinuities in human/nonhuman cognition, emotions, social organization and morally relevant behavior, and implications for the human treatment of nonhuman animals.  
 
Invited Speakers:
Contributed Papers:
Full titles, schedule and abstracts are available at our conference webpage.
REGISTRATION:
Please register for the conference by clicking here. Registration is completely free, but mandatory, so that we can properly arrange for catering.
ECOM welcomes interested researchers from all nearby institutions to attend. Travel information for visitors to UConn can be found at the conference webpage.
The conference will also have a full conference dinner at Chang's Garden on Friday evening. If you would like to attend the conference dinner, please register for the dinner by clicking here.

Conference Schedule:

Thursday, May 11th:
 2:00-3:00PM    Registration & Welcome
 2:15-2:30PM    Opening Remarks

 2:30-3:45PM    Lori Gruen - "Empathy in Mind"

 4:00-5:00PM    Kelsey Gipe - "Empathy and the Problem of Altruism"

 5:15-6:30PM    Kristin Leimgruber - "Sensitivity to Social Rewards and the Evolution of  Uniquely Human Prosocial Behavior: Evolution from Young Children and Capuchin Monkeys (
Cebus apella)"          
Friday May 12th:
 9:30-10:00AM    Breakfast - Coffee & Bagels

 10:00-11:15AM   Peter Carruthers - "Basic Questions"

 11:30-12:30PM   Gary Comstock* - "Psychological Unity in First-Order Accounts of Metacognitive Behavior in Animals"

 12:30-1:30PM     Lunch! (sandwiches, etc. provided)

 1:30-2:45PM       Hans-Johann Glock - "Determinacy of Content -- The Hard Problem about Animal Thinking"

 3:00-4:00PM       Nicolas Delon & Duncan Purves - "Meaning in the Lives of Humans and Other Animals"

 4:15-5:30PM       Darcia Narvaez - "Humanity's Evolved Nest and its Co-Construction of Human Nature and Morality"

 6:30PM               Workshop Dinner at Chang's Garden


Saturday May 13th:
 9:30-10:00AM      Breakfast - Coffee & Bagels

 10:00-11:15AM    William Hopkins - "Cognitive Neuroscience Research with Chimpanzees and Other Great Apes: Benefiting Human Health and Improving Animal Welfare"

 11:30-12:45PM    Katherine A. Cronin - "Advancing Primate Welfare Through Science at a Modern Zoo"

 12:45-2:00PM      Lunch! (sandwiches, etc. provided)

 2:00-3:30PM        Panel Discussion


* Joint work with William Bauer.    
    
Support:
This conference is made possible with generous support from the UConn Philosophy Department, UConn Humanities Institute and the Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences.