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Encounters: Declaration of Independence 2/4/17 and Bill of Rights 3/4/2017

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Feb. 4 – Encounters: Declaration of Independence

Reception: 3:00pm, Hartford Courant Room
Discussion: 3:30pm-5:00pm
John Trumbull: Visualizing American Independence. Please join us for a discussion about the Declaration of Independence at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. Our discussion will take place in the galleries of the special exhibition “John Trumbull: Visualizing American Independence,” which examines the Revolutionary War through the eyes of artists, most notably John Trumbull (1756–1843). Trumbull, born in Lebanon, Conn., served in the Continental Army and created a series of historical paintings.Read the Declaration of Independence in advance: http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/.
RSVP helpful, but not necessary to faculty@wadsworthathenuem.org.https://www.facebook.com/events/981120442021269/

See photos of our recent event on the Humility and Conviction in Public Life facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/publichumility/posts/406413269706963


 March 4 – Encounters: Bill of Rights

Noon-2pm

Join the conversation as we discuss the Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution. The Bill of Rights was created in response to calls from Congressional representatives (such as Connecticut’s Roger Sherman) for greater constitutional protection of personal freedoms and rights of American citizens. It outlines specific prohibitions on governmental power. The amendments include the right of free speech, protections against unreasonable search and seizure, and a speedy and public jury trial.

We invite members of the public to read the amendments and participate in a discussion at the Library’s Hartford History Center. We’ll explore issues that confront us every day, and how we can better understand our rights.

Read the Bill of Rights here: https://www.billofrightsinstitute.org/founding-documents/bill-of-rights/

Lunch will be served; participants must register in advance.
RSVP by calling 860-695-6367 or by email: jeagosto@hplct.org.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1652819315019776/
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Encounters: A Forum for Public Discussion

What’s in a name? The creation of the United States of America made us a democracy and a republic. That creation story and the players in it are very much with us. “Hamilton,” is one of the biggest Broadway hits and presents founders Alexander Hamilton, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr as flesh and blood men. With their flashes of brilliance and crippling personal deficits they invent a new government.

Politics has occupied public attention for the past year as we elected a new U.S. president. A deeper dive into documents created by our founders is especially timely.

The Hartford History Center at Hartford Public Library, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, and the University of Connecticut’s Humanities Institute, are launching a community engagement partnership with a new discussion series called Encounters. The partners will provide discussion leaders to engage in topics aimed at strengthening our ability to know ourselves and one another through respectful and challenging dialogue. This February and March, Encounters will focus on the fundamental documents that define our democracy.

For more information

 

Thursday, September 22, 2016, 2016 Presidential Race – featuring UConn President Susan Herbst and distinguished faculty, our Director Michael Lynch will be one of the panelists

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Thursday, September 22, 2016

5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Hartford Public Library
500 Main Street
Hartford, CT

It’s finally upon us!  The Presidential election we’ve been digesting and debating for over a year is ready to commence and there’s still so much to talk about.  Please join UConn President Susan Herbst, along with faculty panelists Paul Herrnson, Micki McElya, and Michael P. Lynch for a discussion and question and answer session about the upcoming election. (For information on our panelists, please click more info next to their names in the left column)

The event will begin at 5 p.m. with refreshments and networking. At 5:30 p.m.the formal program will open.

To RSVP online for this event, please click “New Registration” in the top left-hand corner of the page.  All are welcome! We look forward to seeing you there.

This event is a collaboration of the Metro-Hartford Alliance and the University of Connecticut.

Questions? Please contact University Events & Conference Services at rsvp@uconn.edu or by calling (860) 486-1038.

https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/index.php?eventid=197703&

Humanities Institute/Folger Library “Transcribathon”, September 14th, 10 am – 4 pm

You’ve seen the First Folio, now try and read handwriting from Shakespeare’s time!

We invite you to take part in the Humanities Institute-Folger Library “Transcribathon,” to be held

Wednesday,  September 14th, 10 am – 4 pm in the Great Hall of the Alumni Center.

Humanities Institute/Folger Library "Transcribathon"
You’ve seen the First Folio, now try and read handwriting from Shakespeare’s time!

The Transcribathon is an event connected with the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Early Modern Manuscripts Online project, which is an effort to transcribe and digitize hand written documents from the Age of Shakespeare. [http://folgerpedia.folger.edu/Early_Modern_Manuscripts_Online_(EMMO)] Staff from the Folger will be on site to lead the event. Participants will transcribe and encode manuscripts, individually or in small groups. There will be food (lunch and pizza at the end of the day), fun, entertaining manuscripts, transcription sprints, prizes, and an easy-to-use online transcription platform called Dromio. UConn will be working on the seventeenth-century diary of the fascinating Rev. John Ward, who in addition to his church duties was a learned humanist and active in medical and scientific circles. Learn to read the original documents of the English Renaissance, and be a part of history by getting your name on the completed edition. Please join us, and encourage your students (classes welcome) and colleagues. The more the merrier!

For more information, contact: Brendan Kane at brendan.kane@uconn.edu

Here are the links to the pdfs for today’s event:

dromio_quick-ref-guide

early-modern-alphabet_abbreviations

UCHI director Michael Lynch, The “neuromedia” future, in meaningoflife.tv. Michael imagines a world where Google is built into our brains.

mol-2016-08-16-wright-lynch

 

 

Director of the Humanities Institute Michael Lynch, explores the dangerous insecurity of American Exceptionalism.

banner-michael-us-newsThe Danger of ‘American Exceptionalism’

The siren call of American exceptionalism ends up encouraging only demagoguery.

By Michael P. Lynch | Contributor

Aug. 14, 2016, at 7:00 a.m.

Over the last month, there has been a steady drumbeat of talk about America’s “greatness” – whether it was making it great again (Donald Trump) or already being the greatest country on Earth (the Obamas and Hillary Clinton). Yet what does it really mean to say America is “great” – now or in the future? Not surprisingly, it depends whom you ask: their politics, their views on the health of the economy and so on. But differences on the meaning of “greatness” go deeper as well and often concern a single idea that is of increasing national importance: American Exceptionalism. read more

Moving the Conversation Forward (Workshop on Intellectual Humility in Secondary Education)

HC

 

 

Moving the Conversation Forward

August 3, 2016 – Kenneth Best – UConn Communications, UConn Today

Middle and high school teachers are on campus this week learning how to use genocide and human rights education to address complex historical and current issues.HC

A group of middle and high school teachers discuss the question of what causes genocide during the Upstander Academy at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center. (Sean Flynn/UConn Photo)

The program – The Upstander Academy: Intellectual Humility in Public Discourse Summer Institute – was developed by the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center and the Upstander Project, with assistance from secondary educators in Connecticut.

The week-long session is part of the Humanities Institute’s Public Discourse Project, a research and engagement program examining the role that intellectual humility can play in meaningful public dialogue, and the initial activity sponsored by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation for research on balancing humility and conviction in public life.

The Upstander Academy at UConn is associated with the national Upstander Project, which aims to overcome indifference to social injustice by using learning resources, including documentary films, to motivate individuals to move from being “bystanders” to becoming “upstanders” – people who take action in defense of those who are targeted for harm.

Glenn Mitoma, director of the Dodd Research Center and assistant professor in the Neag School of Education, says the week-long institute focusing on human rights and genocide will be followed by future summer sessions on philosophy and on American Studies. He notes that early secondary education – middle school – is when geography and world history become part of the public school curriculum, providing the opportunity to introduce conflict resolution issues to students. read more

http://today.uconn.edu/2016/08/moving-conversation-forward/

See the Folio at the UConn’s campus art museum, the William Benton Museum of Art, from September 1-25, 2016.

First Folio- shakespeare-folger

September 1-25, 2016

The First Folio exhibit, which is free and open to the public, can be found at the William Benton Museum of Art from September 1-25, 2016. Located at 245 Glenbrook Road in Storrs, the Benton’s hours are as follows:

Tuesday – Friday, 10 AM – 4:30 PM
Saturday and Sunday, 1 – 4:30 PM

For a Full Schedule of Events click here

The Humanities Institute is pleased to announce the appointment of Alexis L. Boylan as New Associate Director

alexis boylan (photo by Feifei Luo)
Alexis Boylan (photo by Feifei Luo)

Alexis L. Boylan, Associate Professor, (Art & Art History and Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies).

Professor Boylan’s research focus is on American art from the colonial to the contemporary periods, with particular emphasis on race and gender. She is succeeding Brendan Kane, Associate Professor (History) who is completing his term as Associate Director.