Frank Costigliola

FACULTY RESIDENTIAL FELLOW


Frank Costigliola
Frank Costigliola

Frank Costigliola is Professor of History at the University of Connecticut. A specialist in the history of U.S. relations with Europe in the twentieth century, Costigliola published Awkward Dominion: American Political, Economic, and Cultural Relations with Europe, 1919-1933 (Cornell, 1984, 2010) and France and the United States since World War II: The Cold Alliance (Macmillan, 1992). His most recent monograph is Roosevelt’s Lost Alliances: How Personal Politics Helped Start the Cold War (Princeton, 2012), which won the annual book prize given by the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. This study traces how personalities, emotional predispositions, and cultural backgrounds influenced diplomatic relations among Allied leaders in World War II and during the early Cold War. Costigliola edited The Kennan Diaries (Norton) and co-edited America in the World: The Historiography of American Foreign Relations since 1941, both published in 2014. He has also published some 40 essays, including a piece in The New York Review of Books. A past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, Costigliola has held fellowships from the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (2002-03), the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Norwegian Nobel Institute.

 
While a fellow at the Humanities Institute, Costigliola will work on his next book, an examination of the intense emotional and intellectual relationship with Russia of America’s premier foreign policy strategist, George F. Kennan. This study integrates biography, foreign relations history, and emotions history.

 
Frank Costigliola’s web page in the Department of History at the University of Connecticut.