Martha J. Cutter

FACULTY RESIDENTIAL FELLOW


Martha J. Cutter
Martha J. Cutter

Martha J. Cutter is Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Connecticut, where she has taught since 2006. Since 2006 she has also been the Editor-in-Chief of MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States, and from 2004-2006 she was the Editor-in-Chief of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers. She received her Ph.D. from Brown University and her B.A. from Harvard.

 
Professor Cutter’s scholarship investigates the ways that dominant discursive systems configure certain social groups as disempowered and the rhetorical methods employed by these groups to resist such social formations.  Her first book—Unruly Tongue: Language and Identity in American Women’s Writing (University Press of Mississippi, 1999)—won the 2001 Nancy Dasher Award from the College English Association; analyzes questions of language and power within nineteenth-century U.S. literature and culture. Her second book, Lost and Found in Translation: Contemporary Ethnic American Writing and the Politics of Language Diversity, published in 2005 by UNC Press, assesses how contemporary multi-ethnic writing uses the trope of translation to renovate dominant constructs of American identity and discourse.  She has also published more than thirty articles and book chapters on multi-ethnic literature.

 
While at the Humanities Institute, Professor Cutter will finish her current book project, Picturing Slavery: Illustrated Books and the Visual Culture of the Transatlantic Abolition Movement, 1820-1855. This study analyzes illustrated anti-slavery books alongside broadsides, pamphlets, almanacs, and artworks to demonstrate that some illustrated books formulate an alternative to the dominant visual culture of abolition, which often relies on a cognitive separation between the white, viewing subject and the abject, enslaved other.

 
Martha Cutter’s web page in the Department of English at the University of Connecticut.