Natalie Munro

UConn Faculty Fellow

Natalie Munro
Natalie Munro

“A 30,000 year history of human foraging and farming in the Aegean:  the view from Franchthi Cave, Greece”

Natalie Munro is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Connecticut. She is a graduate of the University of Arizona, Simon Fraser University and Southern Methodist University.

Munro is an archaeologist who studies the transition from foraging to farming societies in the greater Mediterranean Basin using ancient animal remains. Her site-based approach integrates ecological, economic, social and ritual interpretations from faunal remains to build local histories. Using a behavioral ecological framework, individual sites are connected to broader evolutionary themes such as human demography, animal domestication, sedentarization, and ritual practice at a regional scale. Munro has a special interest in the formative conditions of agriculture, the adoption of animal domesticates and their spread from the Near East into Europe. She has active research projects in Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Greece and has published in a variety of peer-reviewed journals including Science, PNAS, Current Anthropology, and Journal of Human Evolution.

While at the Humanities Institute, Munro will prepare a monograph on the 30,000-year zooarchaeological sequence from the pivotal site of Franchthi Cave, Greece. Franchthi Cave is unique in its long temporal span that encapsulates transformative events leading up to and across the forager-producer transition.