Author: mem17025

Publishing NOW : Adina Berk

Adina Popescu Berk
Senior Editor for History, Yale University Press
November 29, 2018, 4 pm

I acquire in all periods and subfields of American and European history. I look for projects that challenge and change the historiographical conversation, as well as projects that address and inform essential questions in the public sphere and that seek to bring a historian’s perspective to a broad readership. I am particularly interested in projects that conceptualize American history broadly and place the United States in a global context. Themes and topics of particular interest are the way environmental factors and climate crises have shaped societies, the history of empires and the resistance to empires, the history of economic and financial development, connections between the United States and Asia, Europe, Africa, Latin America, the history of borderlands, histories of human migration, the rise of the right, African American history, Latino history, and Native American history. At Yale I am building on a distinguished history list including, among many other leading historians, recent prize-winners Manisha Sinha, Benjamin Madley, Steve Pincus, Carlos Eire, Pekka Hämäläinen, Martha Hodes, and many others.

Publishing NOW : Christine Smallwood

Christine Smallwood, New York Times
October 15, 2018, 4 pm

Christine Smallwood is a writer and critic living in New York. Her reviews, essays, and short stories have been published in Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, The New YorkerBookforumThe Paris Reviewn+1, and Vice. She holds a PhD in English Literature from Columbia University and is a core faculty member of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research.

New article published by Eleni Coundouriotis, Professor, Department of English

Rohingya Muslim children, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, struggles to keep in queue due to pushing as they wait for their turn to collect meals distributed to children and women by Turkish aid agency at Thaingkhali refugee camp, Bangladesh, Friday, Oct. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

Our fellow from 2017-2018, Eleni Coundouriotis, Professor, Department of English has had a new article published.
Read here: http://politicsslashletters.org/exile-refugee-ethics-reading/

 

Publishing NOW: Viet Thanh Nguyen

On April 10, 2018, UCHI Director Michael P. Lynch interviewed Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times best-selling author Viet Thanh Nguyen for the final event of the 2017-2018 Publishing NOW series (https://humanities.uconn.edu/publishing-now/ ). Nguyen was at UConn as part of the UConn Reads program(https://uconnreads.uconn.edu/) and kindly found time to swing by UCHI and talk to faculty and students about his books, navigating the publishing world , finding time for creativity, and the role of the public intellectual. It was a lively dialogue and a fantastic way to end a year of brilliant conversation about the current state of publishing, ideas, politics, and the humanities.

 

 

 

The Cambridge History of Ireland

The Cambridge History of Ireland

General Editor: Thomas Bartlett

 

FOR RELEASE on 30 April 2018

 

Announcing a landmark survey of Irish history from c.600 to the present day

 

Written by a team of more than 100 leading historians from around the world, this is the most comprehensive and authoritative history of Ireland yet attempted

 

Vibrant, comprehensive, and accessible, The Cambridge History of Ireland presents the Irish story – or stories – from 600 to the present. Four comprehensive volumes bring together the latest scholarship, setting Irish history within broader Atlantic, European, imperial and global contexts.

 

The work benefits from a strong political narrative framework, and is distinctive in including essays that address the full range of social, economic, religious, linguistic, military, cultural, artistic and gender history, and in challenging traditional chronological boundaries in a manner that offers new perspectives and insights.

 

Each volume examines Ireland’s development within a distinct period, and offers a complete and rounded picture of Irish life, while remaining sensitive to the unique Irish experience.

 

About the Editors

 

Thomas Bartlett has held positions at the National University of Ireland, Galway, then as Professor of Modern Irish history at University College Dublin, and most recently as Professor of Irish history at the University of Aberdeen, until his retirement in 2014. His previous publications include Ireland: A History (Cambridge, 2010). Brendan Smith is a Professor of Medieval History  at the University of Bristol. He is the author and editor of numerous books on medieval Ireland, including several collections of historical documents. Jane Ohlmeyer is Erasmus Smith’s Professor of Modern History at Trinity College, Dublin and the Director of the Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity’s research institute for advanced study in the Arts and Humanities. Since September 2015 she has also served as Chair of the Irish Research Council. Professor Ohlmeyer is the author/editor of eleven books, including Making Ireland English: The Aristocracy in Seventeenth-Century Ireland (2012). James Kelly is Professor of History at Dublin City University and President of the Irish Economic and Social History Society. His many publications include Sport in Ireland, 1600–1840 (2014), which won the special commendation prize offered by the National University of Ireland in 2016.

 

More information on the individual volumes

 

The first volume of The Cambridge History of Ireland presents the latest thinking on key aspects of the medieval Irish experience, focusing on the extent to which developments were unique to Ireland. The openness of Ireland to outside influences, and its capacity to influence the world beyond its shores, are recurring themes. Underpinning the book is a comparative, outward-looking approach that sees Ireland as an integral but exceptional component of medieval Christian Europe.

 

Volume Two looks at the transformative and tumultuous years between 1550 and 1730, offering fresh perspectives on the political, military, religious, social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and environmental history of early modern Ireland. As with all the volumes in the series, contributors here situate their discussions in global and comparative contexts.

 

The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was an era of continuity as well as change. Though properly portrayed as the era of ‘Protestant Ascendancy’, it embraces two phases – the eighteenth century when that ascendancy was at its peak; and the nineteenth century when the Protestant elite sustained a determined rear-guard defence in the face of the emergence of modern Catholic nationalism. This volume moves beyond the familiar political narrative to engage with the economy, society, population, emigration, religion, language, state formation, culture, art and architecture, and the Irish abroad

 

The final volume in the Cambridge History of Ireland covers the period from the 1880s to the present. This insightful interpretation on the emergence and development of Ireland during these often turbulent decades is copiously illustrated, with special features on images of the ‘Troubles’ and on Irish art and sculpture in the twentieth century.

 

Volume 1. 600–1550

Brendan Smith, Editor

9781107110670

674 Pages

Volume 2. 1550–1730

Jane Ohlmeyer, Editor

9781107117631

808 Pages

Volume 3. 1730–1880

James Kelly, Editor

9781107115200

862 Pages

Volume 4. 1880 to the Present

Thomas Bartlett, Editor

9781107113541

952 Pages

Each Volume

£100.00   $130.00   €116.71

Four Volume Set

9781107167292

2800 Pages

£350.00   $475.00   €408.49

 

For a full list of contributors to each volume, visit www.cambridge.org

 

For an author interview or more information please contact

Amy F Lee at Cambridge University Press: aflee@cambridge.org

You SHOULD…Play: Horizon Zero Dawn

“You should immerse yourself in new, strange, and sometime dystopian worlds through playing video games such as:

 

Horizon Zero Dawn by Guerrilla Games

 

Any of the Fallout Series by Bethesda Game Studios

 

I recommend playing any of these recent action/role-playing games as a way to experience multiple types of creative output at the same time: graphics, design, narrative and character development, music, and movement. It is an awe-some and brain-tingling, anticipatory experience to tear the plastic wrap off a new game, pop it into my console, and awake in a new environment having to suss out what are the rules and boundaries that govern this particular world or universe. I have learned my ethical and moral compass is strong because I can’t play a bad guy and sleep well afterwards. I appreciate the truly visceral realness of the experience, so much so that my mind conjures up what it would smell like walking through this landscape or that. Many of the latest games are so beautiful that I like to take pictures of my cats as they walk in front of the monitor with the game world as their backdrop.”

http://thewitcher.com/en/witcher3

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallout_(series)

 

Anne Langley
Dean of the UConn Library

Daniel Hershenzon and Jonathan Bobaljik 2018 NEH Award Winners

Daniel Hershenzon and Jonathan Bobaljik
Two UConn Humanities Former Fellows
2018 NEH Award Winners

Project Director: Daniel Hershenzon
[Summer Stipends]
Project Title: Jewish Manuscripts in the Early Modern Mediterranean: Between Piracy, Redemption, and the Spanish Inquisition
Project Description: Research leading to publication of a book-length study of religious artifacts and piracy in the early modern western Mediterranean.

Project Director: Jonathan Bobaljik
[Documenting Endangered Languages – Preservation]
Project Title: Bogoraz’s Itelmen Notebooks
Project Description: The digitization, transcription, and transliteration of Vladimir Bogoraz’s handwritten notebooks of Itelmen language-related material. Published in hard copy and online with an introduction and linguistic commentary, the material would be made freely available and would supplement an Itelmen dictionary currently in development.

 

You SHOULD…Read: Frankenstein and Black Skin, White Masks

“I recommend reading Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818) and Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks (1952) together.  Shelley was an anti-colonialist who was also concerned with the great question of what it means to be a human being, especially as posed by the Swiss philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  The novel raises the problem of taking responsibility for what one creates and the damage that occurs from failing to do so.  She raises, as well, the perspective of the created, the Creature, whose existential struggle against his monstrosity is epic.  Fanon examines a similar question from the perspective of those created from colonialism, enslavement, and its accompanying racism.  Written when he was 25 years old, it places him in conversation with the precocious Shelley, who wrote her great work when she was 19.  These books offer the prescience and intellectual capacity of youth and the importance of speaking to the human condition across the ages.   As both show, maturity requires not imitation but realizing the question one must pose for subsequent generations.   Failure to do such leaves little recourse but to burn in the cleansing force of fire or collapse in the despair of tears.  And what might such question be but the creation of conditions for living embodiments of freedom?”

 

https://www.thereadinglists.com/lewis-gordon-reading-list/

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/84/84-h/84-h.htm

https://www.amazon.com/Black-White-Masks-Frantz-Fanon/dp/0802143008

 

-Lewis Gordon,
Professor of Philosophy
University of Connecticut

You SHOULD…Read: “The Fifth Season”

“You should read …

N.K. Jemisin’s The Fifth Season. To identify this book as “fantasy” or “post-apocalyptic,” while accurate, would also be wholly inadequate. At its core, The Fifth Season is a novel about power, oppression, and the costs—physical, emotional, and psychological—of living in a world that denies your humanity so thoroughly that you cannot even recognize it in yourself.

In brief, the story involves a tectonically unstable world in which one small group of people possess the power to sense and control these tectonic shifts. When a massive earthquake shakes this fragile land, it initiates a “fifth season” of ash and death, forcing characters to make difficult choices about how to survive. This summary makes the novel seem primarily environmental in its concerns, but Jemisin is after more than a warning about the dangers of massive ecosystem collapse. At its core, The Fifth Season is a study of fear as a method of social control, determining who is “us” and who is “other,” who is a person and who is merely a tool. Jemisin’s nuanced world-building is designed not to impress with its innovation, but rather to bring us into a deeper understanding of how histories are forgotten and rewritten over time and how caste systems are built over generations. Like all good fantasy, the allegory of own world is clear, but at the same time the fictional world offers us the opportunity to explore with new eyes, exposing our own biases and assumptions. Jemisin draws us into her characters with remarkable skill, vividly evoking the difficulties of loving and trusting when your life is marked by fear and abuse. In the end, we must ask which poses a greater threat to these characters’ survival: the land itself, unstable and deadly, or a society that asks nothing less than the sacrifice of our own humanity. ”

 

-Lindsay Cummings
Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts
CRT Dramaturg
University of Connecticut