DHMS

DHMS Presents Shaoling Ma

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative Presents: What Do Media Do?: The Case of Late Qing China. Assistant Professor of LIterature, Yale-NUS, Shaoling Ma. Live. Online. Registration required. February 22, 2021, 6:00pm. Co-sponsored by the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

What Do Media Do? The ‘Case’ of Late Qing China, 1861–1906

Shaoling Ma (Assistant Professor of Humanities, Literature, Yale-NUS College)

February 22, 2021, 6:00–7:15pm

An online webinar. Registration is required for attendance.

During the last few decades of the Manchu Qing dynasty (1644–1912), writers, intellectuals, reformers, and revolutionaries grasped what it is that media do even as they did not yet employ a distinct term for communicative media (meiti) as such. My talk, largely based on my forthcoming book, The Stone and the Wireless, Mediating China 1861-1906, asserts that media do not mediate between this and that entity before first mediating between some version of its already mediated form as discursive representations in texts and images, and the apparently unmediated technical device or process. If mediation names not just an object of inquiry but also a comparative method, then “late Qing China” refers to more than a case study. The road to an immanently media inquiry does not have to lead to China, but it might be worthwhile to begin there. My first book starts with the deceptively simple question of what it is that media do: there, the political economy or actual work of mediation only surfaces intermittently. It feels appropriate for a second project to ask why it is that digital media have particular trouble representing their modes of production. I will end my talk by briefly sketching this question in the People’s Republic of China’s hyped, digital ascent, in its cultures of platform extractivism foregrounding the low-brow, the crude, and the rural poor.

Shaoling Ma is an Assistant Professor of Humanities (Literature) at Yale-NUS College. She was born in Taiwan, grew up in Singapore, and spent ten years in the United States where she obtained her PhD (University of Southern California, Comparative Literature), and subsequently taught at Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include literary and critical theory, media studies, and global Chinese literature, film, and art. She has published in academic journals such as Configurations, Mediations, and positions. Her first book manuscript, The Stone and the Wireless: Mediating China, 1861-1906 is forthcoming in 2021 with Duke University Press as part of the ‘Sign, Storage, Transmission’ series.

Co-sponsored by the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute

DHMS Presents Allen Riddell

DHMS presents: Every Victorian Novel, Dispatches from Data-Intensive book history, Allen Riddell. Live online registration required. February 15, 2021, 4:00pm.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

Every Victorian Novel: Dispatches from Data-Intensive Book History

Allen Riddell (Assistant Professor of Information Science, Indiana University)

February 15, 2021, 4:00–5:15pm

An online webinar. Registration is required for attendance.

This talk reviews three recent contributions to the history of fiction publishing in the British Isles and Ireland during the 19th century. The three papers share an investment in an inclusive history of the novel and of novel-writing as a profession. They depend on, to varying degrees, the availability of machine-readable bibliographies and of digital surrogates of volumes held by legal deposit libraries (e.g., Oxford’s Bodleian, British Library).

The first article, “Reassembling the English Novel, 1789—1919,” forthcoming in Cultural Analytics, estimates annual rates of novel publication for each year between 1789 and 1919. This period—which witnessed the publication of between 40,000 and 63,000 previously-unpublished novels—merits attention because it was during this period that institutions, organizational practices, and technologies associated with the contemporary text industry emerged.

The second article, “The Class of 1838: A Social History of the First Victorian Novelists,” revisits a research question introduced by Raymond Williams in The Long Revolution (1961) (Chapter 5, “The Social History of English Writers”). This article, published last year, examines the social origins of the 81 novelists who published a novel in 1838. Replicating Williams’s research is essential because Williams’s original study was, by his own admission, preliminary and depended on a small, non-probability sample of writers.

The talk concludes with an assessment of four major digital libraries’ coverage of published Victorian novels. (The digital libraries studied are the Internet Archive, HathiTrust, Google Books, and the British Library.) While evidence suggests that a majority of Victorian novels have been digitized, multivolume novels and novels by male authors are overrepresented relative to their share of the population of published novels. This third paper also provides an occasion to reflect on the past decade of data-intensive literary history, a research field whose prospects have been linked to mass digitization of research and national libraries.

Allen Riddell is Assistant Professor of Information Science in the Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University Bloomington. His research explores applications of modern statistical methods in literary history and text-based media studies. He is the co-author with Folgert Karsdorp and Mike Kestemont of Humanities Data Analysis (Princeton University Press, 2021) (open-access edition in 2022). Prior to coming to Indiana, Riddell was a Neukom Fellow at the Neukom Institute for Computational Sciences and the Leslie Center for the Humanities at Dartmouth College.

DHMS Presents Book Traces

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents Book Traces, Kristin Jensen (UVA), Michael Rodriguez (UConn Library). Live. Online. Registration required. November 18, 2020, 1:00pm. Co-sponsored by UConn Library.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

Book Traces

Kristin Jensen (UVA) and Michael Rodriguez (UConn Library)

November 18, 2020, 1:00–2:00pm

An online webinar. Registration is required for attendance.

Books are not just containers of information: they are also physical artifacts, and they bear traces of the hands they have passed through over time. Many of the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century books in college collections had a life outside the library before they were donated: they may have been exchanged between friends and lovers, carried along to war, filled with idle doodling, or used as a place to record tender memories of lost loved ones. The Book Traces project is an effort to discover these uniquely modified volumes in library collections and advocate for their importance as artifacts of the history of readers’ relationships with their books, and with each other. Kristin Jensen, project manager for Book Traces based at the University of Virginia, will speak about “finding cool stuff in old books” at a time when American college libraries are turning towards mass digitization, shared print consortia, and efforts to manage down the size of print collections. Michael Rodriguez will speak to the UConn Library’s participation in Book Traces, share intriguing examples of marginalia discovered in our collections, and situate Book Traces in a larger context of library collections and strategies.

Co-sponsored by UConn Library.

Based at the University of Virginia Library, Kristin Jensen is the project manager for Book Traces and is currently, along with Prof. Andrew Stauffer, co-directing a planning grant from the Mellon Foundation. Before joining the UVA Library staff, Kristin worked as a project manager at Performant Software Solutions in Charlottesville, Virginia, where she specialized in steering digital humanities projects through the software development process. She has also worked at the University of Virginia’s Morris Law Library, NINES, and the former Electronic Text Center. Kristin holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Virginia with a concentration in eighteenth-century British literature.

Michael Rodriguez is Collections Strategist at the UConn Library, where he coordinates collection development and strategic initiatives, including the Library’s participation in Book Traces. Michael publishes and presents widely in library venues and serves as past president of the Association of College and Research Libraries, New England Chapter. He holds an M.S. in library and information studies from Florida State University.

DHMS Presents Sarah Sharma

Sarah Sharma How to MsUnderstand Media poster. Poster includes a headshot of Sharma and the following text: The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative Presents How to MsUnderstand Media, A Message from the Broken Machine. Associated Professor of Media Theory, University of Toronto, Sarah Sharma. Live, Online, Registration required, November 9, 2020, 4:00pm.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

How to MsUnderstand Media: A Message from the Broken Machine

Sarah Sharma (Associate Professor of Media Theory, University of Toronto)

November 9, 4:00–5:00pm

An online webinar. Registration is required for attendance.

Sarah Sharma is Director of the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology at the University of Toronto and Associate Professor of Media Theory at the ICCIT/Faculty of Information. Her research and teaching focuses on the relationship between technology, time and labour with a specific focus on issues related to gender, race, and class. She is the author of In the Meantime: Temporality and Cultural Politics (Duke UP, 2014). Sarah is currently at work on two projects that take up McLuhan’s media theory for feminist ends. The first is a monograph tentatively titled Broken Machine Feminism which explores the relationship between technology and patriarchal cultures of exit. This project argues for the necessity of a feminist techno-determinist stance in order to address contemporary power dynamics as they intersect with the technological. The second is an edited book collection, MsUnderstanding Media: A Feminist Medium is the Message (with Rianka Singh), which offers a feminist retrieval of McLuhan’s famous adage that the medium is the message.

This talk will outline Sarah’s work on a feminist approach to McLuhan and her argument for the new possibilities of a feminist techno-determinism.

Fall 2020 Events

UCHI has an exciting roster of events coming up this fall, detailed below. Be sure to peruse our offerings and register for the events you’d like to attend. Stay tuned as we announce more upcoming events!

Publishing NOW with Ilene Kalish of NYU Press

September 24, 2020

2:30pm

REGISTER

Fellow’s Talk: Nicole Breault

October 14, 2020

4:00pm

REGISTER

How to Do Nothing Book Discussion

October 19, 2020

6:00pm

REGISTER

Fellow’s Talk: Nu-Anh Tran

October 21, 2020

2:00pm

REGISTER

Publishing NOW with Matt McAdam of JHU Press

October 23, 2020

11:00am

REGISTER

UCHI and DHMS Present Jenny Odell

October 26, 2020

6:00pm

REGISTER

Fellow’s Talk: Kerry Carnahan

October 28, 2020

4:00pm

REGISTER

DHMS Presents Sarah Sharma

November 9, 2020

4:00pm

REGISTER

André Leon Talley

November 12, 2020

6:00pm

REGISTER

Dissertation Grant Writing Workshop

November 16, 2020

3:00pm

REGISTER

DHMS Presents Book Traces with Kristin Jensen (UVA) and Michael Rodriguez (UConn Libraries)

November 18, 2020

1:00pm

REGISTER

Fellow’s Talk: Ashley Gangi

November 18, 2020

4:00pm

REGISTER

Publishing NOW with Gita Manaktala of MIT Press

December 2, 2020

11:00am

REGISTER

Fellow’s Talk: Shaine Scarminach

December 2, 2020

4:00pm

REGISTER

DHMS Presents Jenny Odell

Event poster with floral background. Text reads: UCHI, DHMS, and the creative writing program welcome NYT best-selling author of How to Do Nothing Jenny Odell, in conversation with Yohei Igarashi. Monday, October 26, 2020 at 6:00pm.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057.

The University of Connecticut Humanities Institute and the Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative present:

Multi-disciplinary artist and New York Times best-selling author of How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy (2019)

Jenny Odell

in conversation with Yohei Igarashi

Monday, October 26, 2020, 6:00–7:00pm

An online webinar. Registration is required for attendance.

co-sponsored by the Creative Writing Program

 

How to Do Nothing Book Discussion

In advance of the lecture, UCHI has organized an online book discussion group for UConn faculty and graduate students. This event will take place online on Monday, October 19, 2020, 6:00 p.m. and will be led by Alexis Boylan and Yohei Igarashi.

For this dialogue, we have limited free ebooks (only ebooks) of Jenny Odell’s How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy (2019) available on a first-come first-served basis. To sign up for an e-book and the book club, visit the Eventbrite page and register with a UConn email address BY SEPTEMBER 25, 2020, noon.

Digital Humanities & Media Studies Launches Website, Speaker Series

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies (DHMS) initiative of the Humanities Institute officially launched its new website last week. According to this website, “DHMS seeks to engage the UConn community in explorations and exchange about all aspects related to the digital humanities and media studies, particularly as they pertain to knowledge production in the humanities.” DHMS was founded in 2016 and began its work under the directorship of Anke Finger, professor of German Studies at the University of Connecticut (UConn).  In 2019 Yohei Igarashi, associate professor of English at UConn, became its new director. This initiative, which also offers a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities and Media Studies, is a unique interdisciplinary resource at UConn as it brings together faculty and students already working in either or both fields of digital humanities and media studies.

DHMS has also launched a speaker series this year beginning with three invited guests. On October 2nd, UCHI played host to Annette Vee from University of Pittsburgh for a talked entitled Algorithmic Writers and Implications for Literacy, co-sponsored by the Aetna Chair of Writing and the Neag School of Education’s Reading and Language Arts Center. DHMS is also co-sponsoring talks by Nancy Baym of Microsoft and Hal Roberts of The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society in the Winter and Spring of 2020, respectively, 

For more information or to subscribe to the DHMS mailing list, please contact Yohei Igarashi.

DHMS speakers poster