DHMS

DHMS: The Ends of Knowledge

The Ends of Knowledge. Seth Rudy and Rachael Scarborough King, with a response from Michael Lynch. November 16, 2022, 1:00pm. UConn Humanities Institute Conference Room. This even will also be livestreamed.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting, computer-assisted real time transcription, and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

The Ends of Knowledge

Rachael Scarborough King and Seth Rudy

November 16, 2022, 1:00pm
Homer Babbidge Library, Humanities Institute Conference Room
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This event will also be livestreamed with automated captioning. Register to attend virtually.

Toward interdisciplinary exchange, this event addresses the following questions: What would you say your discipline’s goals are, when it comes to advancing knowledge? How are they like or unlike the “ends” of other disciplines? The speakers, Rachael Scarborough King (UC Santa Barbara) and Seth Rudy (Rhodes College) put such questions to a historian, a physicist, a literary scholar, a computer scientist, a biologist, a digital humanist, a legal scholar, a journalist, an AI researcher, an activist, as well as scholars working in gender studies, environmental studies, Black studies, cultural studies, and more. Each scholar wrote up an essay in response, and these are collected in the forthcoming volume, The Ends of Knowledge: Outcomes and Endpoints Across the Arts and Sciences (Bloomsbury).

UCHI Director, Michael Lynch, will be acting as respondent to the two speakers.

Rachael Scarborough King is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of Writing to the World: Letters and the Origins of Modern Print Genres (2018) and editor of After Print: Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Cultures (2020). She is the Principal Investigator and Project Director for the Ballitore Project, an archives- and digital humanities-based research project.

Seth Rudy is Associate Professor of English at Rhodes College. He is the author of Literature and Encyclopedism in Enlightenment Britain: The Pursuit of Complete Knowledge (2014).

DHMS Presents: Graduate Student Research Colloquium

DHMS presents a graduate student research colloquim, with Adam McClain (The Gendered Voice Project) and Elizabeth Zavodny (“Archive of Our Own as a Site for DH Research”). October 14, 2022, 12:00pm. UCHI Conference Room, Homer Babbidge Library, with pizza and refreshmentse

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting, computer-assisted real time transcription, and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

Graduate Student Research Colloquium

Adam McLain and Elizabeth Zavodny

October 14, 2022, 12:00pm
Homer Babbidge Library, Humanities Institute Conference Room
With pizza and refreshments

“The Gendered Voice Project,” Adam McLain

The “Gendered Voice Project” is a digital humanities project that seeks to graphically and statistically represent the various gendered voices in literature and academia. For the project, voice is defined in two ways: (1) the amount or rate of dialogue spoken within a book, if analyzing fiction; (2) the amount of pages or words written by scholars, if analyzing scholarship. This presentation is an introduction to the methodologies, theories, and prospects of the project, along with various analyses already performed.

Adam McLain is a MA/PhD student in English at the University of Connecticut. He researches and writes on dystopian literature, legal theory, and sexual justice. He has a bachelor’s degree in English and women’s studies from Brigham Young University and a masters of theological studies from Harvard University.

Archive of Our Own as a Site for DH Research,” Elizabeth Zavodny

I’ll be giving an introduction to and contextualization of fanfiction and fan studies research, with a focus on one of the major fanfiction archives, Archive of Our Own. After giving an overview of how the archive is organized, in particular its unique user-generated tagging system, I’ll present how I have used it for a few past projects on genre and commenting practices. I’ll conclude with a brief discussion of some current ideas and questions that I’m currently refining and interested in receiving feedback and suggestions on.

Elizabeth Zavodny is a 3rd-year PhD student in the English department, with a concentration in Rhetoric and Composition. Her research focuses on the social networks of feedback and circulation in online writing communities, with a particular interest in fanfiction communities. Originally from Atlanta, Georgia, she has a BA from Berry College and an MA from the University of Maine. She currently lives in Willimantic with her partner and their two cats.

DHMS: The Digital Transformation of the German Literature Archive

The Digital Transformation of the German Literature Archive. Roland S Kamzelak, Deputy Director of the German Literature Archive, Marbach. September 7, 2022, 2:30 pm. Humanities Institute Conference Room, Homer Babbidge Library. This event will also be livestreamed.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting, computer-assisted real time transcription, and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

The Digital Transformation of the German Literature Archive

Prof. Dr. Roland S. Kamzelak

September 7, 2022, 2:30pm
Homer Babbidge Library, Humanities Institute Conference Room
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This event will also be livestreamed with automated captioning. Register to attend virtually.

The talk will introduce the German Literature Archive in Marbach am Neckar with its important holdings, its challenges and plans for transformation into a digital archive. A focus will be on its growing portal for scholarly editions and the development of a Science Data Center for Literature (SDC4Lit). The role and use of DH methodology and tools will play an important role in the transformation.

Prof. Dr. Roland S. Kamzelak was born 1961 in Subiaco (Perth), Australia. Visited schools in Tettnang, Rockville, Maryland (Highschool Diploma 1980), Friedrichshafen (Abitur 1982) and studied Political Sciences, English and German Studies at the University of Tübingen and the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 1994 Staatsexamen (M. A.); 2004 Ph. D. at the University of Tübingen with “E-Editionen. Zur neuen Praxis der Editionsphilologie. Ida und Richard Dehmel – Harry Graf Kessler. Briefwechsel 1898-1935.” – 1994 – 1999 Academic Assistant at the German Literature Archive Marbach for the edition project Harry Graf Kessler; 1999 – 2000 Cultural Consultant for the Wüstenrot Foundation, Ludwigsburg; since 2000 Head of Development and Deputy Director of the German Literature Archive Marbach with focus on academic editing and digital humanities. – 1996-2013 Visiting lecturer for German Literature at the University of Education Ludwigsburg, since 2010 Visiting Lecturer for Digital Humanities at the University of Würzburg, since 2018 professor; other visiting lectorates at the Institute for Cultural Management, PH Ludwigsburg, at the Universities of Stuttgart (German Literature), Darmstadt (Digital Humanities) und Schwäbisch Gmünd (Angloamerican Literatures).

This event is cosponsored by Greenhouse Studios.

DHMS: Teaching Machines

Poster with headshot of Audrey Watters and text that reads: Teaching Machines: The History of Personalized Learning, by Audrey Watters. Live. Online. Registration required. February 17, 2022, 4:00pm. Co sponsored by the center for excellence in teaching and learning and the Neag School of Education.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities. The event will be presented with automated transcription.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

Teaching Machines: The History of Personalized Learning

with Audrey Watters

February 17, 2022, 4:00–5:00pm
Live • Online • Registration required

Join us to hear Audrey Watters speak about her latest book, Teaching Machines: The History of Personalized Learning (MIT Press), which tells the pre-digital history of “personalized learning.” Watters demonstrates that the history of ed tech does not begin with videos on the internet, or even with the personal computer. Her book instead focuses on early twentieth-century teaching machines, the psychological theories that underpinned them, how they were reported on in the media, and how they shaped and were shaped by the cultures in which they were produced.

Audrey Watters is a writer and independent scholar who focuses on education technology—its politics and its pedagogical implications. Although she was two chapters into her Comparative Literature dissertation, she decided to abandon academia, and she now happily fulfills the one job recommended to her by a junior high aptitude test: freelance writer. She has written for The Baffler, The Atlantic, Vice, Hybrid Pedagogy, Inside Higher Ed, The School Library Journal, and elsewhere across the Web, but she is best known for the work on her own website Hack Education. Audrey has given keynotes and presentations on education technology around the world and is the author of several books, including The Monsters of Education Technology, The Revenge of the Monsters of Education Technology, The Curse of the Monsters of Education Technology, The Monsters of Education Technology 4, and Claim Your Domain. Her latest book, Teaching Machines (MIT Press), examines the pre-history of “personalized learning.” Audrey was a recipient of the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship at Columbia University for the 2017–2018 academic year.

Cosponsored by the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and the Neag School of Education.

In advance of her talk we will be hosting a book discussion on Teaching Machines February 10 at 3:00pm.

DHMS and CETL: Teaching Machines Book Discussion Group

A poster advertising a book discussion about Audrey Watters' Teaching Machines. A picture of the book cover beside text that reads: UCHI's Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning presents a discussion group about Audrey Watters’ Teaching Machines. February 10, 2022, 3:00pm. Live. Online. Registration required. Related event: virtual book talk by Audrey Watters, February 17 at 4:00pm.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities. The event will be presented with automated transcription.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning invite you to a book discussion group about:

Teaching Machines: The History of Personalized Learning

by Audrey Watters

February 10, 2022, 3:00–4:00pm
Live • Online • Registration required.

UCHI and CETL are hosting a book discussion group about Audrey Watters’ new book Teaching Machines: The History of Personalized Learning (MIT, 2021). Watters is perhaps best known for her website Hack Education, which covers “the history of the future of education technology.” Teaching Machines expands on that project, looking at how the desire for a technical solution to the social problem of equality in education pre-date the digital era.

To participate in the book discussion, please register. The first twenty registrants with UConn email addresses will receive a free electronic copy of Teaching Machines (MIT Press, 2021). Please email uchi@uconn.edu to receive your ebook. We also have paper copies that can be picked up once our office reopens in February.

In conjunction with this event, Audrey Watters will give a virtual book talk on February 17, 2021 at 4:00pm. To attend the talk, register here.

DHMS: The Digital Dissertation

DHMS: The Digital Dissertation. Anke Finger & Virginia Kuhn. February 3, 2022, 12:30pm. Live. Online. Registration required.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting, computer-assisted real time transcription, and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

The Digital Dissertation

Anke Finger (UConn)
& Virginia Kuhn (University of Southern California)

February 3, 2022, 12:30–2:00pm

Live. Online (with automated captioning). Registration required.

Digital dissertations have been a part of academic research for years now, yet there are still many questions surrounding their processes. Are interactive dissertations significantly different from their paper-based counterparts? What are the effects of digital projects on doctoral education? How does one choose and defend a digital dissertation? Join the presentation of Shaping the Digital Dissertation: Knowledge Production in the Arts and Humanities (Open Book Publishers, 2021) to discuss precedents and best practices for graduate students, doctoral advisors, institutional agents, and dissertation committees. UCHI’s DHMS initiative offers a graduate certificate in Digital Humanities and Media Studies. Students interested in pursuing the certificate will find this talk especially valuable.

Anke Finger is professor of German, Media Studies, and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies in the department of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages at UConn. A co-founder and co-editor (2005–2015) of the multilingual, peer reviewed, open access journal Flusser Studies, Anke Finger’s closely related scholarship in media studies originates from her work on the Czech-Brazilian philosopher Vilém Flusser. She co-authored the 2011 Introduction to Vilém Flusser, and she is a member of the Flusser project team at Greenhouse Studios. She edited Flusser’s The Freedom of the Migrant and co-edited the collection KulturConfusão: On German-Brazilian Interculturalities (2015). From 2016 to 2019 she served as the inaugural director of the Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative at the Humanities Institute; she also co-founded the CTDH network. She is the co-editor of Shaping the Digital Dissertation.

Virginia Kuhn is a Professor of Cinema in the Division of Media Arts + Practice. Her work centers on visual and digital rhetoric, feminist theory and algorithmic research methods. Her books include Shaping the Digital Dissertation: Knowledge Production in the Arts and Humanities (Open Book Publishers, 2021) and Future Texts: Subversive Performance and Feminist Bodies (Parlor Press, 2016). She has also published several peer-reviewed digital collections: The Video Essay: An Emergent Taxonomy of Cinematic Writing (The Cine-Files, 2016); MoMLA: From Panel to Gallery (Kairos, 2013) and From Gallery to Webtext: A Multimodal Anthology (Kairos, 2008). In 2005, Kuhn successfully defended one of the first born-digital dissertations in the United States, challenging archiving and copyright conventions. Committed to helping shape open source tools for scholarship, she also published the first article created in the authoring platform, Scalar titled “Filmic Texts and the Rise of the Fifth Estate,” (IJLM, 2010) and she serves on the editorial boards of several peer reviewed digital and print-based journals. She received the USC Faculty Mentoring Graduate Students award in 2017 and was the 2009 recipient of the USC Provost’s award for Teaching with Technology. Kuhn directs the undergraduate Honors in Multimedia Scholarship program, as well as the graduate certificate in Digital Media and Culture, and teaches a variety of graduate and undergraduate classes in new media, all of which marry theory and practice.

DHMS: Discriminating Data with Wendy Chun

Discriminating Data. Wendy Hui Kyong Chun (New Media, Simon Fraser University) in conversation with Yohei Igarashi. Live. Online. Registration required. November 18, 2021, 1:00pm.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting, computer-assisted real time transcription, and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

Discriminating Data

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun (Simon Fraser University)
in conversation with Yohei Igarashi

November 18, 2021, 1:00–2:30pm
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Live. Online (with automated captioning). Registration required.

This is an honors event (Multiculturalism & Global Citizenship, Academic & Interdisciplinary Engagement)

In this conversation, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun (SFU’s Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media) will discuss themes from her new book Discriminating Data (published November 2, 2021, MIT Press) about how big data and predictive machine learning currently encode discrimination and create agitated clusters of comforting rage. Chun will explore how polarization is a goal—not an error—within current practices of predictive data analysis and machine learning for these methods encode segregation, eugenics, and identity politics through their default assumptions and conditions. Correlation, which grounds big data’s predictive potential, stems from twentieth-century eugenic attempts to “breed” a better future. Recommender systems foster angry clusters of sameness through homophily. Users are “trained” to become authentically predictable via a politics and technology of recognition. The predictive programs thus seek to disrupt the future by making disruption impossible.

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun is Simon Fraser University’s Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media and leads the Digital Democracies Institute. She is the author of several works including Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics (MIT, 2006), Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (MIT, 2011), Updating to Remain the Same: Habitual New Media (MIT, 2016), Discriminating Data (MIT 2021), and the co-author of Pattern Discrimination (University of Minnesota & Meson Press, 2019). She has been Professor and Chair of the Department of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University, where she worked for almost two decades and where she’s currently a Visiting Professor. She has also been a Visiting Scholar at the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania, Member of the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), and she has held fellowships from: the Guggenheim, ACLS, American Academy of Berlin, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard.

In conjunction with talk we will be hosting a book discussion group about Discriminating Data on November 15, 2021.

DHMS: Daniel Rosenberg on the Origin of the Keyword

DHMS: Machine/Language: The Origin of the Keyword. Daniel Rosenberg, History, University of Oregon. Live. Online. Registration required. November 10, 2021, 11:00am. Cosponsored by the History of Science Reading Group.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting, computer-assisted real time transcription, and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

Machine/Language: The Origin of the Keyword

Daniel Rosenberg (University of Oregon)

November 10, 2021, 11:00am–12:30pm
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Live. Online (with automated captioning). Registration required.

There may be no word more emblematic of our information age than keyword itself, but the ubiquity of the term belies its complexity. Distinct concepts of the keyword were articulated in information theory and in cultural studies beginning in the late 1950s. With the rise of the Web in the 1990s, however, these differing concepts were bound together. The story of this hybridization provides insight into the process by which computers became mediators of culture during the second half of the twentieth century as well as the importance of cultural studies to our understanding of computers.

Cosponsored by the History of Science Reading Group.

Daniel Rosenberg is an intellectual historian with a research focus on the history of information and information graphics. In addition, he writes on a wide range of topics related to historiography, epistemology, language, and visual culture. His books are Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline with Anthony Grafton (2010) and Histories of the Future with Susan Harding (2005). Rosenberg is Editor-at-Large of Cabinet: A Quarterly of Art and Culture, where he is a frequent contributor. He also directs a digital project on historical graphics supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities entitled Time Online. Rosenberg has received grants and fellowships from ACLS, NEH, Stanford Humanities Center, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and American Academy in Berlin among other institutions. Recognitions at the University of Oregon include the Coleman-Guitteau Teaching Fellowship, Fund for Faculty Excellence Award, Williams Council Grant, Faculty Research Award, and Lorry Lokey Award for Science and the Human Condition. Among other subjects, Rosenberg has published on paleolithic calendars, the concept of sloth, the history of Jell-O, and the languages of planet Mars.

DHMS and FoT: Discriminating Data Book Discussion Group

UCHI's digital humanities and media studies initiative and future of truth project present a book discussion group about Wendy Hui Kyong Chun's Discriminating Data, led by Alexis L. Boylan and Yohei Igarashi. November 15, 2021, 3:00pm. Homer Babbidge Library, 4-209. Related event: virtual book talk by Wendy Chun, November 18, 2021, 1:00pm

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative and the Future of Truth project invite you to a book discussion group about:

Discriminating Data

by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun
led by Alexis L. Boylan and Yohei Igarashi

Add to Google calendar. Add to Office 365 calendar. Add to other calendar.

November 15, 2021, 3:00–4:00pm
Homer Babbidge Library, 4-209

To participate, please email uchi@uconn.edu. The first twenty participants to sign up will receive a free copy of Discriminating Data: Correlation, Neighborhoods, and the New Politics of Recognition (MIT Press, 2021).

In Discriminating Data, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun reveals how polarization is a goal—not an error—within big data and machine learning. These methods, she argues, encode segregation, eugenics, and identity politics through their default assumptions and conditions. Correlation, which grounds big data’s predictive potential, stems from twentieth-century eugenic attempts to “breed” a better future. Recommender systems foster angry clusters of sameness through homophily. Users are “trained” to become authentically predictable via a politics and technology of recognition. Machine learning and data analytics thus seek to disrupt the future by making disruption impossible.

Chun, who has a background in systems design engineering as well as media studies and cultural theory, explains that although machine learning algorithms may not officially include race as a category, they embed whiteness as a default. Facial recognition technology, for example, relies on the faces of Hollywood celebrities and university undergraduates—groups not famous for their diversity. Homophily emerged as a concept to describe white U.S. resident attitudes to living in biracial yet segregated public housing. Predictive policing technology deploys models trained on studies of predominantly underserved neighborhoods. Trained on selected and often discriminatory or dirty data, these algorithms are only validated if they mirror this data.

How can we release ourselves from the vice-like grip of discriminatory data? Chun calls for alternative algorithms, defaults, and interdisciplinary coalitions in order to desegregate networks and foster a more democratic big data.

[Book description from MIT Press site]

In conjunction with this event, Wendy Chun will give a virtual book talk on November 18, 2021 at 1:00pm. To attend the talk, register here.

DHMS: Black Beyond Data

DHMS: Black Beyond Data. Jessica Johnson and Kim Gallon. October 25, 2021 at 4:00pm. Cosponsored by Africana Studies.

If you require accommodation to attend this event, please contact us at uchi@uconn.edu or by phone (860) 486-9057. We can request ASL interpreting, computer-assisted real time transcription, and other accommodations offered by the Center for Students with Disabilities.

The Digital Humanities and Media Studies Initiative presents:

Black Beyond Data

Jessica Marie Johnson and Kim Gallon

October 25, 2021, 4:00–5:30pm
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Live. Online (with automated captioning). Registration required.

Jessica Marie Johnson and Kim Gallon are co-Principal Investigators of Black Beyond Data, a new project backed by a $300,000 Mellon grant. Connecting the fields of digital humanities, Black studies, and data and computation, the project seeks to create an open resource for scholars to combat racial injustice through digital humanities.

Cosponsored by the Africana Studies Institute.

Jessica Marie Johnson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the Johns Hopkins University. Johnson is a historian of Atlantic slavery and the Atlantic African diaspora. She is the author of Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World (University of Pennsylvania Press, August 2020). She is co-editor with Lauren Tilton and David Mmimo of Debates in the Digital Humanities: Computational Humanities. She is guest editor of Slavery in the Machine, a special issue of archipelagos journal (2019) and co-editor with Dr. Mark Anthony Neal (Duke University) of Black Code: A Special Issue of the Black Scholar (2017). Her work has appeared in Slavery & Abolition,The Black Scholar, Meridians: Feminism, Race and Transnationalism, American Quarterly, Social Text, The Journal of African American History, William & Mary Quarterly, Debates in the Digital Humanities, Forum Journal, Bitch Magazine, Black Perspectives (AAIHS), Somatosphere and Post-Colonial Digital Humanities (DHPoco) and her book chapters have appeared in multiple edited collections.

Kim Gallon is an Associate Professor of History. Her work investigates the cultural dimensions of the Black Press in the early twentieth century. She is the author of many articles and essays as well as the book, Pleasure in the News: African American Readership and Sexuality in the Black Press (University of Illinois Press, 2020). Gallon is currently at work on two new book projects—Technologies of Recovery: Black DH, Theory and Praxis (University of Illinois Press), a book about the black digital humanities as a site of resistance and liberation and a book titled, Fiction for the Harassed and Frustrated, which examines the role and significance of popular literary expression in the Black Press in the early twentieth century (Johns Hopkins University Press). She currently serves as the inaugural editor for the Black Press in America book series at Johns Hopkins University Press.

Gallon is also the author of the field defining article “Making a Case for the Black Digital Humanities” and the founder and director of two black digital humanities projects: The Black Press Research Collective and COVID Black. She also serves on a number of digital advisory boards for digital humanities projects and grants.