UConn

UCHI and Global Affairs Announce Global Distinguished Humanities Fellowship

In partnership with UConn Global Affairs, the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UCHI) is excited to announce its new Global Distinguished Humanities Fellowship (GDHF). In an effort to strengthen UConn’s commitment to the global community, this fellowship will sponsor an international faculty scholar to visit, learn from, and engage with UConn’s humanities departments.

At a moment when the humanities’ most urgent issues are expanding to touch all corners of the globe, this initiative seeks to foster international collaboration and highlight the importance of the humanities in creating a future that speaks globally to social justice, equity, and the environment. Through public lectures, faculty workshops, talks with graduate students, or other forms of engagement, the recipient of this award will challenge the UConn community to reassess the stakes of its scholarship and service, broadening the horizons of humanistic inquiry for global complexities.

Interested UConn faculty, with the endorsement of their department heads, can nominate an international faculty scholar to visit the UConn Storrs campus for no less than one week and no more than one month.During this time, the scholar will have an office space in UCHI and will be expected to participate actively in the UConn community. International faculty scholars must be from institutions with which UConn has an ongoing MOU (Memorandum of Understanding). Funding for this fellowship totals $10,000 and is expected to include the scholar’s honoraria, travel, and housing during their visit.

Applications are due by March 2, 2020 at 5 p.m. 

For more information and to submit an application, visit the fellowship’s webpage.

UConn Faculty and Graduate Students Among UNH-Mellon Grant Winners

University of New Hampshire (UNH) Center for the Humanities announced the names of its 2019 Summer Institute in Public Humanities seed grant winners. The seed grant was funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. UNH is a member of the New England Humanities Consortium, of which the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UCHI) is a founding member and current executive and administrative hub. Among the winners are two UConn faculty members and one graduate student:

 

UConn UNH Grant Winners

 

Megan Fountain, UConn graduate student pursuing a Master of Arts in Latino and Latin American Studies
The Guatemala-Connecticut Community History Project
Documenting and archiving oral histories of Guatemalan immigrants and their families in Guatemala
Community Partners: A committee of Guatemalan immigrants and community activists including Unidad Latina en Accion (ULA), a grassroots organization; a team of public historians and New Haven Public Schools teachers; Columbia Center for Oral History Research; and Groundswell: Oral History for Social Change.

 

Fiona Vernal, UConn associate professor of history
A Caribbean Museum
Community-based archival collecting to lead to an oral history initiative including one-week traveling pop-up exhibits, a migration exhibit to launch the Caribbean Museum, and salons (panel discussions) about public housing, mobility, and migration
Community Partners:
Connecticut Humanities Council (CHC), The Hartford History Center at the Hartford Public Library, The West Indian Social Club (WISC), and El Instituto: The Institute of Latino, Caribbean and Latin American Studies (ELIN) at UConn, Hartford Public Schools, CREC (Capital Region Education Council)

 

Walter Woodward, UConn associate professor of history and Connecticut State Historian
Doing Public Humanities: An Audio Field Guide
A multi-episode web-based podcast as an audio roadmap into how to practice engaged public humanities
Community Partners: case history participants (faculty doing public humanities)

Word Poetry Books Becomes UConn’s First Major Publishing Initiative

Consider what your bookshelf might look like if you were to remove every book that has been translatedevery Homer, Sappho, Rumi, Li Po, Szymborska, Neruda, or the Bible. Imagine removing every book by an author whose work has been influenced and shaped by a translation. Exceptional literature needs exceptional translators to bring it to life in a new language.

The University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UCHI) is proud to announce World Poetry Books (WPB) as a new collaborative initiative with Dr. Peter Constantine, professor of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages at the University of Connecticut (UConn). Based at UConn, WPB is the only publisher in the United States dedicated solely to publishing books of international poetry in English translation. As a press, our goal is to champion poets and translators from all stages of their careers by creating new communities of readers both inside and outside of the university. We believe every language has its Walt Whitman, its C.P. Cavafy, or Anne Carson, yet most world poetry—especially poetry from underrepresented languages—remains under-published and undiscovered. Our mission is to publish and promote books of vital world poetry from languages other than English. We invite our readers to celebrate the art of translation, so essential to the vibrant circulation of words and ideas. To find out more, and to purchase books, please visit us at: www.worldpoetrybooks.com

You Should…Read: Jonathan White’s Tides (Alain Frogley-School of Fine Arts Associate Dean)

Tides Book CoverWhether it’s beach season, the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing, or our daily proximity in Connecticut to vast bodies of water in only partly predictable motion, there are plenty of reasons right now why you should read Tides: The Science and Spirit of the Ocean by Jonathan White (San Antonio, TX: Trinity University Press, 2017). But the most important is that it’s a wonderful book. White offers an all-too-rare example of a narrative that brings together science, art, and the humanities in a way that is much more than the sum of their parts (and never less). The art is mostly in the writing. Unpretentiously beautiful, it effortlessly weaves together complex science, cultural history, ecology, and even the engineering and economics of generating electric power, with compelling vignettes of the author’s close encounters with his subject, and the lives of those who rely upon it for their survival. Which is, ultimately, all of us; but White is particularly sensitive to the experience of indigenous peoples across the globe, who are frequently both custodians of ancient oceanic knowledge and the first casualties of climate change. He brings to bear decades of experience as a sailor, surfer, and conservationist, to offer a vision that is passionate but never preachy. So read it now, before all too soon you’ll have time only to think about grading papers and shoveling snow.

 

Alain Frogley, DPhil
Associate Dean, School of Fine Arts & Professor of Music History
University of Connecticut

Alain FrogleyWho is Alain Frogley? Alain Frogley is a native of Great Britain and holds degrees from Oxford University and the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught at Oxford and Lancaster universities and in 1994 was appointed to the faculty of the University of Connecticut. He is a specialist in the music of the late-19th and 20th centuries, particularly that of Britain and America, but he has also worked on the cultural contexts of musical nationalism. His most recent work includes research into the reception of British music in Nazi Germany and racial Anglo-Saxonism in music. In 2005–2006 he was a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies.

UCHI Co-Hosts Colson Whitehead Lecture and Book Signing at UConn

The University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UCHI) joins UConn Institute of Africana Studies to host Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winning author Colson Whitehead. Whitehead will join the UConn community on 9/26 at the Konover Auditorium in the Dodd Research Center to discuss his latest novel The Nickel Boys. A book signing will follow the lecture. Other sponsors of this event include the Office of the Provost, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Department of History, the English Department, and the Creative Writing Program.

Colson Whitehead

UCHI Co-Sponsors Faculty Reading Group to Discuss “The Nickel Boys”

The University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UCHI) joins UConn Institute of Africana Studies to host The Colson Whitehead Faculty Reading Group, dedicated to a discussion of Whitehead’s latest novel The Nickel Boys. This discussion is the latest installment in UCHI’s “Publishing NOW” series and will take place at the UCHI conference room on September 19, 2019 from 4:00 to 6:00 PM. This reading project will be followed by a UCHI-sponsored public presentation by Whitehead on September 26, 2019 at 4:30 PM at the Konover Auditorium in the Dodd Center.

Colson Whitehead Reading Project_4

You Should…Read: What the Eyes Don’t See (Juli Wade-CLAS Dean)

What the Eyes Don't See by Mona Hanna-AttishaThis terrific memoir is a story of a public health disaster and the courageous pediatrician who provided the research that eventually forced officials to respond to the truth members of the community had been speaking, unheard. When a decision was made in 2014 to switch the source of water for the impoverished city of Flint, MI to the Flint River without adding appropriate corrosion inhibitors, lead from pipes leached into the water and poisoned the population of about 100,000 people.  In addition to documenting the crisis, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the pediatric residency program at Flint’s Hurley Medical Center and a Michigan State University faculty member, poignantly describes the community she serves, her personal passions and connections, and the circumstances that drove her to investigate and publicize the crisis. I also worked at MSU when the disaster unfolded and lived less than 50 miles from Flint. I was appalled and saddened, and proud of the people who worked tirelessly to move forward in a positive way. For those (like me) who love a good detective story, particularly one grounded in science and full of positive human nature, I highly recommend this read. If only it were fiction…

 

Juli Wade
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
University of Connecticut

Julie WadeWho is Juli Wade? In December 2018, Juli Wade was named the new Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Connecticut. Prior to this, Professor Wade was the Associate Provost at Michigan State University, where she had joined the psychology department in 1995. She received her Bachelors’ degree in psychology from Cornell University and her doctorate from the University of Texas. Wade’s research focuses on understanding “how structural and biochemical changes within the central nervous system regulate behavior, using lizards and songbirds as model organisms.” Read more about Dean Wade in UConn Today.